Machaeromancy

In a nutshell, Machaeromancy is divination with the use of knifes, swords, or sickles. It has been used by various groups of people throughout history, including the Romani and the Greeks. This technique is ine my grandmother taught me, as well as my adaption for yes and no questions.

My Grandmother’s

Take a cutting board and a kitchen knife (you can use a butter knife if you are fearing cutting yourself). Place it in a place where you are facing North. Place the knife flat on the board and, while thinking of your question, spin the blade. What direction the tip of the knife is pointing will be your answer. Here are some basic notes I have to help give a foundation to work on:

North- a lot of struggle, slow process, aid from ancestors needed.
North east: A new beginning that will take time to manifest.
East: New Beginnings, need for creative thought, lots of energy to start.
South east: New beginning that will come into fruitation very quickly, need to be quick on your feet and think ahead.
South: Needing immediate response, quick results, need to put energy to work and move.
South West: Danger, very quick failure
West: Endings, time for mourning, putting matters to rest
Northwest: slow failures, lots of struggle, loss financially

My Method for yes and no questions

Take a sharp knife and hold the tip of your blade (carefully) between your fingers while you are outside. Thinking of your question, toss the blade in the air (preferably away from you) in a way that it allows the blade to spin. You can read how the blade lands in two different ways:

If you are good at making blades stick upright in the ground, then if it lands sticking up then the answer is yes. If it does not, then it is no.

If you are not good with the above, read by what direction the blade is pointing in after it lands. South, southeast, north east and east is yes where Southwest, west, north west and north is no.

Hope you guys enjoyed this.

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Fascinating! :fire:

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Well cool. In my house as a kid crossed knives on the table forewarned of bad luck. I wondered if there was any more knife related lore.

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More likely than not. Knives have been around for thousands of years. I imagine every culture has some sort of belief with knives

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Wonderful! I’ve seen this type of divination before.

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Great tutorial @C.Wilson ! :+1:

Same here! :smiley:

From my family:

  • always bury a broken knife respectfully, wrapped in newspaper, never just dispose of it in the trash

  • if you cut yourself often with the same knife, ask it to stop, if you continue to have accidents consider getting rid of it, aka treat it as though alive, and intentional, but also open to reason

  • don’t stir things with knives, if you do you are “stirring up trouble for yourself” (this may relate to the Church trying to avoid pagan or witchcraft rites which used knives, still, I do not stir liquids with a knife just in case, may stir soup or something while cooking to avoid dirtying a spoon though)

  • generally treat knives with respect, do not criticise them (“this damn thing just slipped” is rude) and do not allow them to become dull if their purpose requires they are kept sharp (so, carving knives, steak knives, tomato knives etc should all be kept sharp).

As I recall, from Vaastu, the Hindu art of placement, you should store knives to the north part of the kicthen or drawer if possible, for Rudra.

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Thank you for sharing @C.Wilson and @Lady_Eva :blush:

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