The Necronomicon Gate-Walking Ritual & The Book of Azazel Infernal Lake of Fire Ritual

From my knowledge, by undergoing the Gate-Walking ritual, one would travel up the Sephirothic Tree of Life, and then down the Qlipothic Tree of Death, effectively merging with your Holy Guardian Angel/Higher Self, allowing you to be rid of the Ego and weaknesses that hold back all your magick ability/potential. I guess you could say that all your blocks in magic will be rid of completely. Your soul would be transmuted into gold, and you’d be able to work with and summon all the 50 names of Marduk with ease. But the same goes for the 72 spirits of the Goetia after the Lake of Fire Ritual, but one would only travel down the Qlipothic Tree of Death.

I don’t want to say that they’re the same thing but does the Ars Theurgia and later works of the Lesser Key of Soloman tie in rest, essentially being the same thing? What would happen if one were to complete both initiatory rites? And would just one rite provide the same benefits as the other, based on the fact that there are similarities between the 50 names and the Goetia or are there none? Would there be a significant change/is it even possible or has anyone accomplished this already because this is some pretty heavy pathworking. Are there similarities or differences? Maybe I’m not asking the right questions because my brain is lowkey fried but some insight on this would be cool.

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Hmm…the gate walking of the Simon Necronomicon has nothing to do with the Tree of Life or the Qlippoth as far as I can tell. Those belong to the Hebrew mysticism of the Kabbalah, and the Simon stuff is a really bad pastiche of Sumerian mythology (I am assuming you are referring to the Simon book). They are not the same thing.

The Lake of Fire ritual is also not connected to the Qlippoth at all and its only connection to the Goetia is the fact that one of the Gatekeepers is Belial. I don’t think completing the Lake of Fire would make calling those spirits any easier than it is already.

Here is someone’s experience gate-walking using a different version of the Necronomicon:

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The gate-walking of the Necronomicon absolutely has everything to do with the Tree of Life/Death. It does not belong to Hebrew mysticism of the Kabbalah. And the Simon stuff is definitely not a “pastiche” of Sumerian mythology.

Oh ok, I think I read The Book of Azazel too fast then, I was high-key skipping words and shit

Sorry, but check your sources. The Tree of Life is Kabbalah, which is Hebrew mysticism. That is where the whole concept originates. The term “sephiroth” means “emanations,” just like the word “Qlippoth” means “husk” in Hebrew. It has become a major part of Western Ceremonial Magick, thanks to the Golden Dawn, but it certainly did not originate there. It’s source materials are Hebrew religious texts. Any book on basic magick in the Western Tradition will tell you as much.

People have tried to create alternative versions, with New Age ideas like “Hermetic Kabbalah” but is all still derived directly from the original Kabbalah, which is Jewish.

And yes, the Simon work is a pastiche of Sumerian mythology. It is mostly made up and not historically accurate at all. That doesn’t mean it doesn’t work, of course, as magicians work with fictional concepts all the time, but it does mean that it is not actual Sumerian magick. We have no historical records of the ceremonial magick of the Sumerians nor their religious rites, so anything trying to claim to be so is obviously fabricated by its author, just like Simon stole the title of “Necronomicon” from the work of H.P. Lovecraft to give his book a dark and spooky quality.

I have the book Gates of the Necronomicon by Simon and while it might be loosely based on an idea similar to the Tree of Life, it most definitely does not have “absolutely everything” to do with it and I don’t see how walking the gates would accomplish the same things as pathworking the Tree.

I should add, if you want a version of gate walking that is derived from the Tree of Life, try Donald Tyson’s book The 13 Gates of the Necronomicon.

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:laughing: your posts are exactly what i was thinking as i read the original post.

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I think I might’ve confused you a little bit, yes Tree of life is Kabbalah, but what I was trying to say was that it didn’t have Judaic origin.

I have experience using the Spellbook with the 50 names, but I’ve only read a small portion of Simon. Because I had some insane results from it, I thought the relation was legit. I think I have that version too, haven’t read it yet tho

Okay, you have just contradicted yourself. The Tree of Life is Judaic in origin because Kabbalah is Judaic in origin. It doesn’t come from anywhere else.

As I said above, there are many versions, such as “Hermetic Qabalah,” but they are syncretic. The original is Judaic.

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No I thought so too! I fsho read otherwise while Yes Kabbalah is Judaic, but was taken from an earlier source. Anyways sounds like you’re right and I’m wrong, have you read Donald Tyson’s work? Would both of those gate-walking paths be considered standalone or do they coincide with each other in certain aspects?

What evidente can you present to show that it comes from an earlier source?
There are ideas of trees in other traditions but to my knowing none to the extent of the kabbala.

As for the lake of fire ritual as @DarkestKnight wrote its not connected to the qliphotic tree atleast its never even mentioned in the book.
The rituals purpous at first glance is to align one with the infernal and unlock that potential for you without restraints.

What earlier source? The only source that I know of, according to pretty much every book I’ve ever read on the subject, is the descriptions in Sefer Yetsirah, and later expanded upon in the Zohar.

You do know that kabbalah is not a modern thing, right? The Sefer Yetsirah is the oldest extant text in esoteric Judaism, and though it has not been definitively dated, there are annotations from known scholars of the 10th century CE, which makes it at least 1000 years old.

Yes, I’ve read almost all of Tyson’s work. I like it and think he’s a good writer. He is well versed in the Western Esoteric Tradition and the Golden Dawn.

Tyson’s Necronomicon and the Simon stuff are not related. Each set of “gates” stand alone. If you click the link I provided in my first post, you can read another member’s experience Walking the Gates of the “1586” Necronomicon, which are more closely similar to those provided by Simon (maybe even the same, I haven’t compared them).

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