Lovecraft Gods

I am very ignorant on this topic but… According to me not the gods that lovecraft created are that their creations or are real gods that he discovered?

2 Likes

I did research on H.P. Lovecraft for a school project.

Both of his parents died in insane asylums, and there was a large period of his life where he lived as a hermit. He died of cancer, apparently, but I remember it as an organ failure through research. It’s been little over a year since I brushed up on this topic.

The Dunwich Horror really stood out to me in regards of occultism, which leads me to believe he had the knowledge. The Statement of Randolph Carter was another story I read by him that stood out to me due to its imagery. I’ve never read stories that hit the hammer on the nail as perfectly as H.P. Lovecraft regarding multi-dimensional beings. Other authors fall just short of it, and it’s pretty clear H.P. Lovecraft had to have done some serious research.

There is an essay that someone wrote that brought me to the belief he was an occultist. I confronted my English teacher about H.P. Lovecraft’s occultist history, and her response was a typical “if you dig too deep in that topic, we’ll give you another author.” I will hopefully have the link to that by tomorrow. It contained an argument that stated he had innuendo in a story regarding the Hermetic Tree of Life.

I would put my money on the gods he “created” are close to, but not quite, explanations of true spirits. His stories describe them vividly, which coincides with the whole idea that planes deeper than the Astral contain spirits than one could not describe with words, or even comprehend at all. If he ran into the actual Cthulhu somewhere in a deep plane, he did his best trying to describe something incomprehensible.

If you want to find them, good luck getting the true “Lovecraft gods” instead of 12-year-old-child thoughtforms.

4 Likes

[quote=“WeisseSonne, post:2, topic:6001”]I did research on H.P. Lovecraft for a school project.

I would put my money on the gods he “created” are close to, but not quite, explanations of true spirits. His stories describe them vividly, which coincides with the whole idea that planes deeper than the Astral contain spirits than one could not describe with words, or even comprehend at all. If he ran into the actual Cthulhu somewhere in a deep plane, he did his best trying to describe something incomprehensible.[/quote]

I agree with WeisseSonne. Long ago I’d seen a couple of documentaries on Lovecraft and didn’t find much take aways. That’s just my opinion. This said, I found numerous sublime references in his stories and real life activities which suggested he was an occultist.

Firstly in those times He couldn’t find many publications willing to print about real spirits as they are not as sensational as the printed stories. Secondly, society wouldn’t have openly accepted magic in those times. Not much Return on Investment you see.

Additionally, I was watching some underground video publishes of Anton Lavey where there was a reference of Lovecraft. Lavey had openly claimed about ceremonial magic in his church. But he had an inner circle with whom he use to perform rituals. Lovecraft was a part of it.

I believe Lovecraft was doing a bread crumb trail with his stories. For those who see this trail can follow it to the rabbit hole. But you gotta follow the trail not focus on the piece of crumb. I know horrible metaphor. Sorry couldn’t find better due to my ignorance. But what I’m trying to say is instead of focusing on the character spirit in lovecraft’s story. You’d rather want to focus on its characteristics. This way you’d be able to match these with one or more of the real life spirits. Who knows that those spirits might be waiting to work with you already.

THIS ALL IS IMO. So please do correct me where I’m wrong.

Regards,
Himanshu

2 Likes

Of course it’s possible that he was the most secretive of occultists, but if so Lovecraft certainly -fronted- as an atheist of the purely materialistic variety. Insofar as his personal correspondence goes.

Even if that were true, people have certainly got plenty of results from using his works in a magickal idiom. One possibility is that his family’s history of mental instability, his lifelong seldom-interrupted solitude, childhood night terrors combined with extremely vivid nightmares that informed his creative work - resulted in his unconsciously or even unbelievingly re-presenting subliminal contact with the currents and entities portrayed as his ‘creations’. Ironically, in the same way he alluded to creative and sensitive natures unconsciously re-presenting Cthulhu artistically in the short story Call of Cthulhu.

But then again, maybe he was an occultist who fooled everyone all along. My hunch is that the circumstances of his own life revealed lack of magickal control over his environment, and the sense of his character and mental processes conveyed in his written correspondence don’t seem to indicate an intentional seclusion to pursue personal and mystical visions from the other side. I think he was in love with the darkness of his own mind and intentionally remained in that limited state for the thrill of the things thrown out of his own thoughts and dreams. But to me none of it seems like intentionally searched-for revelations, I think he was more of a passive receiver of his own psychological garble plus possibly some very real but unrecognized spiritual contact.

Well, that’s one analysis anyway.

EDIT - Oh and I don’t deny the occult practices described in some of his works, only my scepticism that it resulted from personal practice and not personal research.

1 Like

I’m certain that happens A LOT when people are accused of having occult symbolsim in theirt art - yes, of course some artists and musicians etc do this intentionally, but I’ve known quite a lot of people in the arts and media who honestly wouldn’t know the LBRP from the ASPCA and yet their work also carries this symbolism.

The mind open waiting for the creative muse is so close to the mind intentionally opened to spiritual or divine inspiration, that what comes through is often magickally potent stuff, and all the better for being unfiltered by concerns about paradigms or “is this real?” that a human chanelling intentionally would have.

I don’t use a lot of stuff from fiction compared to some people but I don’t see any reason to reject the overall idea, because of things like this.

One of my occult teachers once had Gandalf show up and teach him some stuff during one of his rituals. I asked him if he thought that was a real Gandalf from somewhere in the multiverse or a Gandalf thought form made by the lord of the rings fandom , his answer was that is was sort of the same thing either way.

My interpretation of whats meant by that is it’s a very blurred line between “created” and “pre-existing” because both use the same energy, the only real difference being if you use something channeled from a chuthulu that exists independently of humans it’ll be stronger then a conventionally created chuthulu thought form. But all that really means is the actual chuthulu entity wouldn’t have a strong foothold in your reality and your just using its energy indirectly as opposed to directly calling it into your reality tunnel. It would still be the same thing in the end.

I remember during one of my early rituals I actually made contact with some entities that I made up for my comic and other stories and I thought “holy shit, these are actually real somewhere”

I’ve read alot of Lovecrafts stories and personal correspondences. I find the claims he was an occultist to be dubious. Deffinetly an inspired mind and he has provided some great material for chaos magic because of how creepy his creations are. Some of them certainly have that “anti-cosmic” flavor. I have to say I frown a little with disaproval at the Youtube advert for a “Lovecraftian Grimoire”. Knowing as much as I do about Lovecraft and the Cthulu mythos it is the equivalent of me taking inspiration from World of Warcraft and writing an “Azerothian Grimoire.”

1 Like

That sounds tempting but I would be concerned about getting sued by Blizzard. That being said there’s plenty of other public domain properties people havent really tried to do magic around. Hows about a wizard of Oz Grimoire? Doesn’t have the pizazz of lovecraft, but still something to think about.

I will agree that the pre-existing entity/ egregore is a pretty petty distinction in all liklihood.

Traffic signs for example did not exist until very recently in human history and are entirely made up symbols, however they are undoubedtly real and if a car smacks into one the driver of said vehicle will be very aware that they have hit something solid. The made up traffic sign even has the power to command any sentient human driver within its set range of authority.

One can see pretty clearly how this would apply to egregores made up of raw astral material in a similar way that the traffic sign is made up of raw earthen material.

[quote=“defectron, post:6, topic:6001”]One of my occult teachers once had Gandalf show up and teach him some stuff during one of his rituals. I asked him if he thought that was a real Gandalf from somewhere in the multiverse or a Gandalf thought form made by the lord of the rings fandom , his answer was that is was sort of the same thing either way.

My interpretation of whats meant by that is it’s a very blurred line between “created” and “pre-existing” because both use the same energy, the only real difference being if you use something channeled from a chuthulu that exists independently of humans it’ll be stronger then a conventionally created chuthulu thought form. But all that really means is the actual chuthulu entity wouldn’t have a strong foothold in your reality and your just using its energy indirectly as opposed to directly calling it into your reality tunnel. It would still be the same thing in the end.

I remember during one of my early rituals I actually made contact with some entities that I made up for my comic and other stories and I thought “holy shit, these are actually real somewhere”[/quote]

I’ve been meaning to tell you this for a long time but as a mod I had to keep my personal opinions to myself. But as I’m not a mod anymore, here it is: you’re so full of it! Gandalf? Really? If you ever meet Harry Potter, tell him I said hi!

Bran-Finally somebody putting a voice to what I have been afraid to say for months due to being a novice. But this whole thing about thoughtforms like Gandolf having power seems to me to be a bunch of crap. Talk like that wants to make me give up the occult entirely.

At the end of the day, I guess I don’t believe humans have that degree of creative power. That is why I am turning to the occult in the first place. I want to use real beings that exist apart from whether I believe them to be true or not. I am not interested in simply unlocking powers that lie inside myself by acting as though these demons exist on their own accord if they in fact don’t.

I truly don’t mean to offend amybody, this is just a topic that has been a source of frustration and is constantly causing doubt regarding the power of the occult.

1 Like

[quote=“Bran, post:10, topic:6001”][quote=“defectron, post:6, topic:6001”]One of my occult teachers once had Gandalf show up and teach him some stuff during one of his rituals. I asked him if he thought that was a real Gandalf from somewhere in the multiverse or a Gandalf thought form made by the lord of the rings fandom , his answer was that is was sort of the same thing either way.

My interpretation of whats meant by that is it’s a very blurred line between “created” and “pre-existing” because both use the same energy, the only real difference being if you use something channeled from a chuthulu that exists independently of humans it’ll be stronger then a conventionally created chuthulu thought form. But all that really means is the actual chuthulu entity wouldn’t have a strong foothold in your reality and your just using its energy indirectly as opposed to directly calling it into your reality tunnel. It would still be the same thing in the end.

I remember during one of my early rituals I actually made contact with some entities that I made up for my comic and other stories and I thought “holy shit, these are actually real somewhere”[/quote]

I’ve been meaning to tell you this for a long time but as a mod I had to keep my personal opinions to myself. But as I’m not a mod anymore, here it is: you’re so full of it! Gandalf? Really? If you ever meet Harry Potter, tell him I said hi![/quote]

Whatever you say man, I’m not trying to convince anyone of anything I just post shit here when I get bored sometimes.

That being said as a word of advice, to anyone who does go into the occult try not to put yourself in a box, mores possible then you might think. If you have an idea your not sure about you might want to investigate it through any occult means you have mastered before fully dissmissing it.

2 Likes

Im with Defectron on that. I likewise post out of boredom sometimes so take advice with a Grain of Salt. For those whom are against LOTR keel in mind it is Occult Symbology. The occult is ridden with many symbolic associations with multiple layers of meaning…in some cases was not meant for you to understand, but rather is an effective form of someone elses magic. Which points out it is up for you to figure all that out, because it is extremely rare people will spoon feed those specific details, much less even mention them.

It’s always going to be a controversial topic, at the end of the day do you get results? That’s all that matters.

The rest is religion (sorry for paraphrasing Narius there) and dogma.

While I’m not a LoTR fan at all, I do know Hercule Poirit’s thoughtform, when I close my eyes and project into his consulting room, has been bloody helpful to me since I started talking to him last week.

But then also last week Belial (who most poeple agree is pretty real) made a startling statement that helped me see my entire approach to certain things in a new light, and that sure as shit didn’t come from my mind.

jboy, have you read the Kybalion yet?

[b]The Law Of Mentalism[/b]

“THE ALL is MIND; The Universe is Mental.”-The Kybalion.

This cosmic law embodies the truth that human reality is, in essence, mental. That rather than human minds being a property within a purely physical universe, the universe is itself an infinite mind (consciousness). The infinite universe is alive and intelligent. Science proves that the physical human brain doesn’t create consciousness (thinking), it simply channels it just as a radio/TV channels its programming.

You are a radiating bundle of consciousness (energy: EEG/EKG).

Your thoughts are consciousness, and your thoughts spontaneously
influence physical reality.

Every thought you have attracts the experience of its electromagnetic vibration.

By the Law of Cause and Effect: You think love and you attract love; you think happiness and you attract happiness; you think prosperity and you attract prosperity and conversely, you think hate and you attract hate; you think anger and you attract anger; and you think fear and you attract fear, and so forth.

Because the universe is mental in nature, changing the conditions of the universe, life on Earth or the circumstances of your own life is done by the sheer will of your thoughts.

How To Apply This Cosmic Law: Your thoughts are magnetic and every thought you have is either creating/destroying and attracting/repelling your desires.

What you desire (think) will manifest in your own life and your individual thoughts also contribute to the fabric of the collective human experience. We all paint the picture of our own lives, and we all contribute to the picture of humanity. Humanity is one and all, and all is one.

Your Environment Is Your Thinking Objectified.

That’s copied (and then formatted with bold and paragraph breaks!) from this forum post I found.

I live and work with a man who believes everything, including other people, is a projection of his own self, and we decided we weren’t going to argue about it (we both, after all, are reasonably smart and both have our own “proof” we’re correct), and what matters most is we’re still able to work on things together without needing to “convert” each other. There really has never once been a single need for either of us to change and adapt,and yet we’ve had amazing results - including changing the actual past on a few occasions.

And how can any of us be so sure we know what’s real when every day people suffer minor brain injuries that completely change their personalities - tiny structural changes to a blob of greyish-pink stuiff that seem to make someone into a completely different person?

We’d be fit to hand out the definitive award on what’s real and what isn’t, if we were more permanent ourselves - but we’re completely mutable and it’s stunningly easy to implant false memories, or to alter someone’s core personality through manipulation and conditioning.

Hell, even organ transplant recipients often pick up traces of the preferences of the dead person whose organ they received, can anyone remotely pretend to be completely a 100% “real and original” personality, when a new liver could turn you into a Justin Beiber fan or something?!

Whatever, didn’t mean to rant - believe what you want, just keep an eye out for results you can verify is all I have to say. :slight_smile:

2 Likes

But how many of us has proved that law of attraction wrong?

How about those who tried to love and give happiness to the world, but were instead sentenced to death with hate and fear?

But i understand that it might not be so simple, and that there is everyone’s thoughts affecting to the big picture - so simply 1 person thinking something major may not cause it.

i’m sort of 50/50 about the Gandalf thing, i’m not sure what it is - but i’m not denying it either.

And hey if Gandalf helps it obviously helps and that’s usually a good thing.

I wouldn’t say “its stunningly easy” to implement false memories and change people’s personality totally, if it was then many people here would have done it but i think not :smiley: but i guess easy can be a relative term.

I guess the liver can posses some energies or positive memories about somethings (or negative) and since it is in your body and if the influence i strong you might subcoinciously adapt to some.

But it really is! Straight psychology shows this:

Creating False Memories

"In Missouri in 1992 a church counselor helped Beth Rutherford to remember during therapy that her father, a clergyman, had regularly raped her between the ages of seven and 14 and that her mother sometimes helped him by holding her down. Under her therapist’s guidance, Rutherford developed memories of her father twice impregnating her and forcing her to abort the fetus herself with a coat hanger.The father had to resign from his post as a clergyman when the allegations were made public. Later medical examination of the daughter revealed, however, that she was still a virgin at age 22 and had never been pregnant. The daughter sued the therapist and received a $1-million settlement in 1996.

… How can we determine if memories of childhood abuse are true or false? Without corroboration, it is very difficult to differentiate between false memories and true ones. Also, in these cases, some memories were contrary to physical evidence, such as explicit and detailed recollections of rape and abortion when medical examination confirmed virginity. How is it possible for people to acquire elaborate and confident false memories? A growing number of investigations demonstrate that under the right circumstances false memories can be instilled rather easily in some people.

My own research into memory distortion goes back to the early 1970s, when I began studies of the “misinformation effect.” These studies show that when people who witness an event are later exposed to new and misleading information about it, their recollections often become distorted. In one example, participants viewed a simulated automobile accident at an intersection with a stop sign. After the viewing, half the participants received a suggestion that the traffic sign was a yield sign. When asked later what traffic sign they remembered seeing at the intersection, those who had been given the suggestion tended to claim that they had seen a yield sign. Those who had not received the phony information were much more accurate in their recollection of the traffic sign.

My students and I have now conducted more than 200 experiments involving over 20,000 individuals that document how exposure to misinformation induces memory distortion. In these studies, people “recalled” a conspicuous barn in a bucolic scene that contained no buildings at all, broken glass and tape recorders that were not in the scenes they viewed, a white instead of a blue vehicle in a crime scene, and Minnie Mouse when they actually saw Mickey Mouse. Taken together, these studies show that misinformation can change an individual’s recollection in predictable and sometimes very powerful ways.

Misinformation has the potential for invading our memories when we talk to other people, when we are suggestively interrogated or when we read or view media coverage about some event that we may have experienced ourselves. After more than two decades of exploring the power of misinformation, researchers have learned a great deal about the conditions that make people susceptible to memory modification. Memories are more easily modified, for instance, when the passage of time allows the original memory to fade.

False Childhood Memories

It is one thing to change a detail or two in an otherwise intact memory but quite another to plant a false memory of an event that never happened. To study false memory, my students and I first had to find a way to plant a pseudomemory that would not cause our subjects undue emotional stress, either in the process of creating the false memory or when we revealed that they had been intentionally deceived. Yet we wanted to try to plant a memory that would be at least mildly traumatic, had the experience actually happened."

Lots of similar examples on that page, Loftus is one of the leading researchers into this.

And How to Instill False Memories gives some other practical examples.

Our memories define who we believe ourselves to be, our capabilities etc., and also what we believe about the world around us, so those alone change someone’s personality (if you had a suddent “recollection” of being abused by satanists as a child, wouldn’t it affect what you believe about this stuff now for example?) - and this is the most famous study on how easy it is to change people’s personality, by giving them a specific role:

Stanford Prison Experiment

"Twenty-four male students were selected, from an initial pool of seventy-five, to adopt randomly assigned roles of prisoner and guard, in a mock prison, situated in the basement of the Stanford Psychology Department building, for a period of between seven and fourteen days.

The participants adapted to their roles well beyond Zimbardo’s expectations, as the guards enforced authoritarian measures and ultimately subjected some of the prisoners to psychological torture. Many of the prisoners passively accepted psychological abuse and, at the request of the guards, readily harassed other prisoners who attempted to prevent it.

The experiment even affected Zimbardo himself, who, in his role as the superintendent, permitted the abuse to continue. Two of the prisoners quit the experiment early, and the entire experiment was abruptly stopped after only six days, to an extent because of the objections of Christina Maslach. Certain portions of the experiment were filmed, and excerpts of footage are publicly available."

Brainwashing someone is easy, it’s not like TV or movies (flashing lights and weird drugs) - every domestic abuser whose victim stays living with them has mastered it, and here’s a look at how to do it properly:

How Stuff Works - Brainwashing

"In the late 1950s, psychologist Robert Jay Lifton studied former prisoners of Korean War and Chinese war camps. He determined that they’d undergone a multistep process that began with attacks on the prisoner’s sense of self and ended with what appeared to be a change in beliefs. Lifton ultimately defined a set of steps involved in the brainwashing cases he studied:

  • Assault on identity
  • Guilt
  • Self-betrayal
  • Breaking point
  • Leniency
  • Compulsion to confess
  • Channeling of guilt
  • Releasing of guilt
  • Progress and harmony
  • Final confession and rebirth

­Each of thes­e stages takes place in an environment of isolation, meaning all “normal” social reference points are unavailable, and mind-clouding techniques like sleep deprivation and malnutrition are typically part of the process. There is often the presence or constant threat of physical harm, which adds to the target’s difficulty in thinking critically and independently.

We can roughly divide the process Lifton identified into three stages: breaking down the self, introducing the possibility of salvation, and rebuilding the self."

This is echoed by cults, including mystery cults and genuine (as in, spirit-given) initiations of various sorts.

We’re also ALL being affected by this kind of stuff 24/7 (advertisers hinting we can have perfect lives if we just buy their crap, and so on) so it’s an important thing to be aware of IMO.

2 Likes

Sorry i’m in hurry, but i just want to state out that i didn’t say that its not possible to create false memories i just said that it probably is not “easy”

The doctor who created those false memories must have been pretty MLG skilled on that stuff, and an average person can’t do the same by reading the instructions from google/youtube.

Try this: design a memory you’d like to have make it something simple and not anything that will cause you to start cracking up.

Write a really short description of it, and set a timer on your computer or somewhere for 40 days’ time.

Next time you drink heavily (if you do) and assuming it’s in less than 409 days from writing it down, bring out the notes of that memory next morning while still hungover, and read them, imagining yourself in that situation. Do it a few times over.

When the reminder at 40 days goes off, see how real that memory feels.

This works, I discovered it by accident back in my boozin’ days and shared it with a few people, there’s something about hangovers that makes your mind more suggestible.

I’m not going to aregue over qualitative definitions of “easy” :o) but fake memories of a childhood holiday were implanted on one TV show I watched and people honestly believed them after a very short period of time.

1 Like

I wouldn’t do it if it didn’t have any positive side effects, my head is messed up enough already as it is :smiley:

I have studied a lot about false childhood memories, and even if you can have someone close by that says “yeah that did happen” it can still be difficult at times to pinpoint the exact truth, because not just false memories are a concern but also the fact that memories we had that were in fact real and did happen, can become distorted as you age.

I watched something recently about this that said with most memories, even if something significant to ther person experiencing it, that within 40 minutes to 4 hours afterward, our brain has already begun tossing out details of that event in an attempt to simplify the memories and save space in your mind for the details it deems at more important. I don’t understand why that is because the human brain is obviously not scarce on memory space. I mean, most of us have thousands of songs memorized and many of them were memorized unintentionally but research constantly shows that our brain becomes lazy with memory retention and decides to discard the facts it found useless.

So if you try to remember something to remind yourself if it really happened or not, changes are if it did not happen, just by asking your friend hey did this happen can trigger a process in their mind and make them believe it did when it turns out, that friend wasn’t even there that day so how would he know? Yet his mind knows that he longs to help by answering your questions so his mind just starts pulling up a bunch of random facts it knows and saying here, tell him this stuff. So your friend tells you things he think really happened that day and you think, well since someone besides me seems to remember it then it must be true because you are unaware of just how deceiving your mind can be to you.

This is where meditation comes in handy, it can sometimes help you remember the real facts by causing you bring forward those facts your brain discarded, drawing them out of your subconscious so you can see them truthfully, similar to the hypnosis experiments that were mentioned here earlier. But that is also why you need to do it several times as the more you meditate and visualize for memory recall the more the clear the real memory becomes, but I would recommend doing something like this alone in the aid of a spirit you trust only, because recalling what Lady Eva said, your mind is highly succeptible to believe lies while in a deep deep trance or hypnotic state.

HERE’S A FUN GAME:

I like to test this out on my friends and it works almost every time. This will show you just how influential the power of suggestion can be. Next time you’re with a friend, think of a sport, activity, action, or behavior that is common for you two to do when you’re around each other. The more real it seems, the more believable it will be. If you and a buddy Nick like to get drunk together most of the time and one of you always ends up doing something wild while intoxicated, make up a story centered around drunken-ness.

You could say Nick, remember the time when we went to Shananigan’s bar and got super wasted and you pissed in the ashtray outside by the door?

He most likely will say “What, no! I didn’t do that…did I?”

This is where you have to convince him it really happened. Start describing things that were happening around you (not really happening) but the fact that you are making up false details, Nick will think you are doing genuine memory recall and we will begin to assume well, my buddy seems to remember a lot about that night so it must be true. Create false memories but make them realistic, don’t try to convince him a dragon flew over top of the bar and sat it on fire, that won’t work unless the guy is under deep hypnosis and you rehardwire his brain to believe dragons really exist in our world.

Say “Yeah man, we were talkin and you just started pissing right in the ashtray bucket. You were so wasted you must have thought we were at home or something.”

When he starts questioning this say something like “You don’t remember, this old guy came walking by when you were doing that and he laughed and told me I needed to get you home before you get arrested for public exposure, he even offered to call us a cab.” It will start to become more believable for him because now you are adding in fake bystanders and other random facts that supposedly happened that night.

Since your friend is a guy, you could take it a step further and make it really interesting for him by saying “Yeah and we told the guy we were walking home and didn’t need a cab so he left, but then that hot chick we met named Jessica came walking by and realized you forgot to put away your dong after you took a leak and it was hanging out and everything!”

This should get a laugh out of him, even if he still does not quite remember. He may respond like “Nah man, did I really do that? Man is that ever embarassing!”

Then say something like “Yeah you did but you weren’t embarassed at all, I can’t believe you don’t remember this but you were really drunk though. That girl Jessica saw it but she liked what she saw and you two ended up hitting it off out back in the alley behind the bar. How could you forget that dude, Jessica was easily a 9 out of 10.” Then describe this fake Jessica girl, make her sound really hot but don’t over do the details, don’t compare her with Angelina Jolie or someone famous.

This gives your friend a new sense of false pride and awesomeness. At this point, he is not likely to refuse what you are telling him because no longer cares if the memory is real or not. All he can think about is, did I really hit it off with a fine chick like that? Hell yeah! Then the next time you go out in public, find a girl that looks similar to what you described and point her out. “Hey Nick, see that girl right there, that’s what Jessica from the bar looked like”. The more opportunities you find to further reinforce the false memory, the more it becomes real for Nick.

If you really want to have fun, try telling that same story but instead of a hot girl named Jessica, try embarassing your friend by saying he was so wasted he hooked up with a BBW woman named Heather from (insert bad neighborhood name here) and you get the idea, and watch him squirm in utter disguist.

But I read your brain can lie to you on average of over 100 times per day. Think about how much of your life and your memories have probably been forgotten about by now! Kind of sad, and makes you think of the human brain in a whole new way, kind of pathetic isn’t it?

1 Like