Temple of the Vampire (ToV)

Dont know if there is a thread for this so I make this one.

Have anyone any insight to the Temple of the vampire? Especially the vampire bible, is that any good? Im currently reading Nox Infernus, after that Liber Hirudo. Anyone got any feedback on the vampire bible?

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I got my hands on a PDF on-line of Nox Infernus. It is a fun read so far. The “Feeding your shadow” on a full moon or high noon ritual was entertaining (something I’ll have to try). As far as Temple of the Vampire organization, I’ve come across it several times, but don’t know any members or inner workings (so if there is a member on this forum, I would be really interested to hear about their experiences)

I need to learn which book that teaches the best and easiest feeding-technique

I think it is such a personal thing Zamael. Some people really love their own techniques and it just works for them. There are many great and interesting methods mentioned on this forum alone. You should experiment with what feels best and natural to you.

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From the small skimming I’ve done, it seems that it’s more of a philosophy

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They have a website:

http://templeofthevampire.com/

Yes I know but it doesnt say much of their inner working etc

I was a member for three years. While at the lower levels the information is useful if you have nowhere else to start, unfortunately as you move up the Circles, more and more pressure is placed on you to secure a cryonic preservation contract in order to demonstrate your commitment to what they call “Dayside Immortality”, i.e. the preservation of your physical body with the expectation that future technology will be sufficient to revive your corpse. The Temple presents a lot of futuristic speculation as proof that this may actually happen. The actual reason they do this is because the founder of the Temple, George Smith (AKA Lucas Martel/Nemo) and his son and some close confidants, including Anton LaVey’s son Xerxes actually make a great deal of their personal income from being the insurance agents you go to in order to purchase the policy that funds the cryonic suspensions, which can range anywhere from $30,000 to upwards of $150,000 in some cases. This link will tell you all you need to know about this organization.

If you must know what they teach, their documents are available through torrents. A keen eye will also notice that their higher Circle teachings are almost directly plagiarized from the Scientology book 8-8008. In short, I do not recommend any interaction with this group. At best they are a scam, and at worse they are a cult that rips off the teachings of another cult and passes it off as their own.

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Wow.
Thanks.

Thats alot of great information Venenum. While I like the idea of cryonic preservation, I draw the line at anyone who plagiarizes from Scientology! lol, Scientology…really…thats the best source you can draw from?!

Its my suspicion that in order to appear like they had something to offer that couldn’t be found in the esoteric teachings of other well known systems like Theosophy and Hermeticism they co-opted the teachings of a group that few people would bother investigating. I myself stumbled across the connection between the teachings quite by accident, as I was researching a paper on pseudoscience for a class and had selected Scientology 8-8008 since it serves as document that outlines the basic and essential metaphysical underpinnings of Scientology as outlined by Hubbard.

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For a member that has been with the TOV for over a decade I couldn’t help but throw a bucket of cold water on this one:

  1. No, the Temple of the Vampire is not run by insurance salesmen or cryonics organizers.
  2. No, for anyone to obtain a cryonics contract it does not cost $20,000-30,000 and you do not go through “George Smith (AKA Lucas Martel/Nemo) and his son and some close confidants, including Anton LaVey’s son Xerxes.” It is covered under a number of–rather popular and mundane–life insurance policies for approximately $20 a month. The Temple recommends it (as well as financial strategies for investment, health strategies with diet and exercise, interpersonal skills, Intrapersonal development, and a number of resources in the direction of good life habits)
  3. No, there is no relation covert or otherwise between the Temple of the Vampire or Scientology (or any other weird, sketchy, globally ambitious religious/political movement for that matter)
  4. No, the Temple of the Vampire is not a CIA project run by the Trump administration to control the world’s minds on behalf of our Russian overlords
  5. The brainwashing that really goes on in the Temple is learning how to think critically and effectively about one’s life and its desired direction. Bad deal, huh?
  6. Get creative with these for the love of God. These conspiracy theories are a bore to read.

Granted some may have learned the secret handshake and were able to peak inside the inner secret Cabal that runs the TOV scam behind the curtain (and that I have been hopelessly clueless on how to penetrate in over 10 years). So slap my ass and call me Sally, what do I know?

In all seriousness, the TOV is a loose interest group of diverse people with convergent interests in both developing incremental, measurable improvements in mundane life and esoteric exploration. Nothing criminal. Nothing weird. Just old fashioned hard work and a tremendously joyous view of life and its exploration.

If there was any pressuring, brainwashing, sketchy business deals, criminal conspiracies, I would have unaffiliated. I don’t do cults. Moral of this story is that people’s stories on the internet are not reliable sources of information (I hope I didn’t need to say that).

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I like there method of attaining the vampiric condition how did it play out for you ?

Hey Izanagi,

Highly dependent on your understanding and meaning of “vampiric condition” to be able to address.

@Hephaestus
Greetings, it’s a pleasure to meet someone from tov, I was wondering if you were willing to share your experience with working with their material?

Sure, but about all of the meat of those experiences are enmeshed in my real world projects and engagements. I’m limited, but in brief I joined when I was an 18 year old (min. age requirement) still with my head in the clouds about all sorts of “esotericisms” and “magic.” Membership kicked my butt in realizing the real world exists and knowing what I needed to do to get my shit together in that arena. That armchair magick stuff, airy-fairy theorizing about Qlipothics/Cabalas, and sneaking around in one’s house with lights out doing occultnik crap wasn’t going to cut it. Much of the initial guidance I recieved at the time was a much needed critical and rational training at that age (skepticism and it’s arm of effective decision making is painfully lacking these days).

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Are they still around?

About 5 of us are still left and we have tailgates twice a year (just kidding).

Website @ http://www.templeofthevampire.com

Thank you

i agree with vonpfaff there is different ways ect… it all depends on u