Temple of Set

I was a member of the Priesthood for many years. I would say the current in that temple is very different from what you’ll find in more modern groups.

I enjoyed my time there. There was a lot of great discussion and community. But what was taught was more philosophical and psychological, and unless you were doing your own research, magic itself was not taught.

If you’re looking for solid training in black magic, I’d look elsewhere.

I know next to nothing about ToS, but I think it’s silly to take Set out of Kemetic context.
For the life of me I can’t understand how Kemetic gods got mixed up in demonology. Either follow Kemeticism, or don’t.

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I think some people want to make demons more than what they are.Its a very unnecessary thing, imo.

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Because most “demons” are ancient gods and goddesses. And most of the ones we know were contemporarily worshiped in surrounding areas and therefore many are interconnected. So it is pretty logical to intermingle the traditions.

It sadly happens in the LHP someone found the goetia and started making baseless connections for the majority of them.

The demonized Gods were never given new names until the goetia surfaced and there’s no evidence that backs up the connections. Besides with Asteroth for the most part.

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Oh that’s right, though usually Mesopotamian right?
I mean, there are no Kemetic gods in the grimoires I think …

There’s demons that were forcibly linked to Set, Anpu, Bastet, and Amun. There’s others as well. Set to Sitri, Bastet to Haagenti, etc.

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Yes and they are ridiculous comparisons, really really stupid.

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Only demon I find to be reasonable is possibly mastema as she was said to be a female Egyptian demon and well as Shezmu who was considered a deified demon of blood and sacrifice I believe.

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Ah Shezmu is pretty cool. I guess it depends on what philosophy/definition you use. As far as I know, Shezmu was more of a deity than a demon in Kemetic thought. There are named demons in the book of the dead … I’m trying to think where or what I have read, it has been awhile since I poked into that subject, but I seem to recall some books and websites with historical/scholarly info on the subject.

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I think one of demons from Goetia is connected to Wadjet but I have nothing to back this up.

I believe Eva has mentioned Bune’s connection to Wadjet.

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And that didn’t originate with me, I had read it somewhere before I saw it for myself, so count 2 on there. :+1:

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Allow me to add my five cents. :slight_smile:

In the TOS, Set is seen as the origin of the character of the Adversary. A god of storms and chaos, he was seen as the enemy to the death cult of Osiris due to his dismemberment of same. He was never listed as a “demon,” which is a term that came much later, but he was still considered antagonistic to the natural order.

The idea is to see the quality of Set rather than to equate him exactly with the more common concept of demons. Remember that the Goetia is not the end-all of demonology; this stuff goes way, way back, at the very least to Sumeria, where you will find a wealth of information on the Canaanite line that later transferred to Egypt.

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So basically TOS uses the idea of Set that was brought about after Osiris cult moved him to a God of chaos, as his original(?) standing was a God of storms, but also a guide of the head to the heavens, among other titles. He was often linked to Ash, but I’m not sure if it was before or after where Ash was made into his concubine or an aspect of him.

Well, the idea was to accept Set as he was before he was vilified, but the fact that he was helped his image, in their mind. :slight_smile:

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Set was seen as the progenitor of isolate consciousness in humankind; The black flame, or man’s divine nature.

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The Asetka mentions this to some degree if I remember right

Yes, I agree he is the adversary for Kemetics, not evil or villainous per se.

Yup, that’s pretty much it. Aquino loved the Bad Guy version.