Let me ask this


#1

For those of you who had been devout occultists of the left handed path, how have the mundane things in your life have shattered and been completely destroyed when you had penetrated those spheres?

And when that happened, how hard was it for you to regain your senses before continuing on? That do you see a fine distinctual line between using power to give you material pleasures over what is needed or forsaking the flesh to move beyond the perceptual perimeter of mundane awareness?

Or do you see that there’s a fine balance to this?

You don’t have to share personal details if you feel that they’d be too revealing but alas, would you say that there’s a definite sacrifice for such fruits?


#2

I started officially down the left hand path at 17 and throughout that time the only things that have been taken out of my life are the things that would have otherwise distracted me from my own development into what I eventually want to become. I kind of think it’s a strange situation with me as these things are taken out of my life for that reason but I feel like once I get where I want to go I’ll get it all back.

Sorry for the vagueness of all that but hope it helps.


#3

I don’t want to get into details, but I sacrificed everything. I left everything behind. I left my past behind. My family. My old Self. My old name. My native language. It all led to greater focus - which led to a clearer path. I knew where I was going and what I wanted, and my approach was (and is) ruthless. No regrets in any way as I’m constatly growing and developing and becoming closely aquainted with the ‘other side’.

With struggle comes strength, with strength comes power.


#4

It’s a situation one can appreciate only after they’ve experienced it. Being stripped of things and struggling with the loss. But in these times, you begin to see things in a new light. You find out what you’re really made of and can be ‘built over anew’.
There’s something about the rawness of loss that brings mental clarity after the sting is over. It teaches us just how much we can withstand and what we’re capable of.
The apprehension of the possibility of losing things subsides once you make up your mind to actually put yourself into this or to walk away.
Another vague response, things of this nature can be incredibly personal but there is no cookie cutter example. It’s do or don’t.


#5

[quote=“Cheezus, post:4, topic:208”]It’s a situation one can appreciate only after they’ve experienced it. Being stripped of things and struggling with the loss. But in these times, you begin to see things in a new light. You find out what you’re really made of and can be ‘built over anew’.
There’s something about the rawness of loss that brings mental clarity after the sting is over. It teaches us just how much we can withstand and what we’re capable of.
The apprehension of the possibility of losing things subsides once you make up your mind to actually put yourself into this or to walk away.
Another vague response, things of this nature can be incredibly personal but there is no cookie cutter example. It’s do or don’t.[/quote]

Oh yeah couldn’t have put that better myself!


#6

I love the answers guys because it’s a very important question. In my own life, it’s been taxing and often seemingly at the wrong times. But the question comes to mind was it so brutal because of the nature of the thing or was it a matter of how hard I clung to an illusion of comfort.

To me, it’s not about modernity or materialism because those are the things that are taken away, those things of status and comfort where the ego capsule is trusted from the tower to dash upon the slanted rocks below. You survive but what do you do? Very scary process indeed and not one that I’m always looking to jump head first into either but the rewards from surviving is precious to say the least.

Thank you all for sharing.


#7

It’s true. The left hand path is all about getting taken out of your comfort zone and learning to adapt and survive by your own power in my opinion. I’ve dealt with alienation from friends and family members and society at large as I went down this path and been thrust into homelessness and other situations I never saw myself ever being in and it all brought me a greater awareness and understanding of my own power and these experiences each and every one of them stripped a weakness away and added a strength in its place. I take on any loss and hardship now with open arms waiting for the power it will eventually bring me.


#8

[quote author=azazym link=topic=198.msg2449#msg2449 date=1341706724]

. But the question comes to mind was it so brutal because of the nature of the thing or was it a matter of how hard I clung to an illusion of comfort.

You survive but what do you do? Very scary process indeed and not one that I’m always looking to jump head first into either but the rewards from surviving is precious to say the least.

Thank you all for sharing.

[quote]

Azazym, I think you really homed in on the crux of the matter: What MAKES IT so brutal and so scary? For me, it was recognizing that I was letting go of everything that made me feel safe, confident & accepted. Because that IS what you’re doing. Its not your world thats changing, its YOU. Your world is changing in response to the person you’re becoming, and so many of the familiar people & environments & opportunities simply do not match Who You Are anymore … and you’re still trying to get a handle on “Okay, what does? Where to next?” You are in completely uncharted territory because you are no longer who you were. And THAT frightened the hell outa me. Still does, occassionally. Because I keep going deeper… :wink: Z


#9

Guys, you definately know the deal. Kitari, you were there and zoe, great responsive prose.