La Madamas


#1

Hey all!

i have a good friend who is on her way to be initiated in the african magickal traditions and she told me of a powerful group of spirits named La Madamas. i was so intrigued by La Madamas. primarily because they are the spirits of african female conjure women from cuba, puerto rico, and the dominican republic who lived hundreds of years ago and are venerated to this day by people.

here is some information on them:

La Madama is the spirit of an old slave who was a conjure woman. Although not an orisha, as her Spanish-language name indicates, the veneration of La Madama was brought to North America by Spiritists and members of the Lukumi and Santeria religions, primarily from Cuba. As with the Indian spirit guides of North American Spiritualism, the name La Madama is applied to more than one entity.

La Madama is the patron of playing card readers and bone readers, the latter a link to her past on the African continent. As a conjure woman, she carries the wisdom of all the old rootworkers from the past. She is the patron of root doctors, and as a spirit guide, she may be called upon by conjure doctors who seek information when faced with difficult clients or intractable jobs of spell-casting. The broom is one of La Madama’s tools; she works with the broom to sweep out all crossed conditions, family issues, troubles, and confusion that clients may bring to the root doctor. Her assistance is sought by those performing rites of spiritual cleansing for clients, opening their roads, or bringing them total success in all they do. She is also petitioned to bless and settle down troublesome folks, bring money into the house, and help bills get paid on time.

Old-fashioned “Aunt Jemima” pancake mix advertising art or “Mammy” style cookie jar figures are images often used to represent La Madama on the altar. Cuban-influenced card readers who work with La Madama may house her in an iron pot, after the manner used when working with orishas, and they will provide her with tools such as a knife to nail down enemies, a pack of playing cards to reveal the client’s troubles, a broom for cleansing and to sweep away crossed conditions, some chalk to mark the magical work and lock it down, and a wooden cross to hold her power. The bright colors associated with La Madama, as well as a broom, are also found on Aunt Jemima and Mammy figures. The offerings La Madama accepts are molasses, whiskey, brown sugar, cigarettes, a cool glass of water, and a vigil candle.

http://readersandrootworkers.org/wiki/La_Madama
http://theoccultconsultancy.blogspot.com/2011/09/la-madama.html
http://sansespiritismo.blogspot.com/2011/10/commission-of-madamas-and-congos.html


#2

[quote=“Amy Madison, post:1, topic:1113”]Hey all!

i have a good friend who is on her way to be initiated in the african magickal traditions and she told me of a powerful group of spirits named La Madamas. i was so intrigued by La Madamas. primarily because they are the spirits of african female conjure women from cuba, puerto rico, and the dominican republic who lived hundreds of years ago and are venerated to this day by people.

here is some information on them:

La Madama is the spirit of an old slave who was a conjure woman. Although not an orisha, as her Spanish-language name indicates, the veneration of La Madama was brought to North America by Spiritists and members of the Lukumi and Santeria religions, primarily from Cuba. As with the Indian spirit guides of North American Spiritualism, the name La Madama is applied to more than one entity.

La Madama is the patron of playing card readers and bone readers, the latter a link to her past on the African continent. As a conjure woman, she carries the wisdom of all the old rootworkers from the past. She is the patron of root doctors, and as a spirit guide, she may be called upon by conjure doctors who seek information when faced with difficult clients or intractable jobs of spell-casting. The broom is one of La Madama’s tools; she works with the broom to sweep out all crossed conditions, family issues, troubles, and confusion that clients may bring to the root doctor. Her assistance is sought by those performing rites of spiritual cleansing for clients, opening their roads, or bringing them total success in all they do. She is also petitioned to bless and settle down troublesome folks, bring money into the house, and help bills get paid on time.

Old-fashioned “Aunt Jemima” pancake mix advertising art or “Mammy” style cookie jar figures are images often used to represent La Madama on the altar. Cuban-influenced card readers who work with La Madama may house her in an iron pot, after the manner used when working with orishas, and they will provide her with tools such as a knife to nail down enemies, a pack of playing cards to reveal the client’s troubles, a broom for cleansing and to sweep away crossed conditions, some chalk to mark the magical work and lock it down, and a wooden cross to hold her power. The bright colors associated with La Madama, as well as a broom, are also found on Aunt Jemima and Mammy figures. The offerings La Madama accepts are molasses, whiskey, brown sugar, cigarettes, a cool glass of water, and a vigil candle.

http://readersandrootworkers.org/wiki/La_Madama
http://theoccultconsultancy.blogspot.com/2011/09/la-madama.html
http://sansespiritismo.blogspot.com/2011/10/commission-of-madamas-and-congos.html[/quote]

It’s crazy that you bring up the association between this and advertising figures like Aunt Jemima, because this happens a lot where they throw in characters that have very historied (made that word up, I’m thinkin’ I’m gonna start makin’ more words up… it’s fun to do) imagery. Of course many of us will miss these things, but it happens more often that not from what I can see.


#3

[quote=“Metatron777, post:2, topic:1113”][quote=“Amy Madison, post:1, topic:1113”]Hey all!

i have a good friend who is on her way to be initiated in the african magickal traditions and she told me of a powerful group of spirits named La Madamas. i was so intrigued by La Madamas. primarily because they are the spirits of african female conjure women from cuba, puerto rico, and the dominican republic who lived hundreds of years ago and are venerated to this day by people.

here is some information on them:

La Madama is the spirit of an old slave who was a conjure woman. Although not an orisha, as her Spanish-language name indicates, the veneration of La Madama was brought to North America by Spiritists and members of the Lukumi and Santeria religions, primarily from Cuba. As with the Indian spirit guides of North American Spiritualism, the name La Madama is applied to more than one entity.

La Madama is the patron of playing card readers and bone readers, the latter a link to her past on the African continent. As a conjure woman, she carries the wisdom of all the old rootworkers from the past. She is the patron of root doctors, and as a spirit guide, she may be called upon by conjure doctors who seek information when faced with difficult clients or intractable jobs of spell-casting. The broom is one of La Madama’s tools; she works with the broom to sweep out all crossed conditions, family issues, troubles, and confusion that clients may bring to the root doctor. Her assistance is sought by those performing rites of spiritual cleansing for clients, opening their roads, or bringing them total success in all they do. She is also petitioned to bless and settle down troublesome folks, bring money into the house, and help bills get paid on time.

Old-fashioned “Aunt Jemima” pancake mix advertising art or “Mammy” style cookie jar figures are images often used to represent La Madama on the altar. Cuban-influenced card readers who work with La Madama may house her in an iron pot, after the manner used when working with orishas, and they will provide her with tools such as a knife to nail down enemies, a pack of playing cards to reveal the client’s troubles, a broom for cleansing and to sweep away crossed conditions, some chalk to mark the magical work and lock it down, and a wooden cross to hold her power. The bright colors associated with La Madama, as well as a broom, are also found on Aunt Jemima and Mammy figures. The offerings La Madama accepts are molasses, whiskey, brown sugar, cigarettes, a cool glass of water, and a vigil candle.

http://readersandrootworkers.org/wiki/La_Madama
http://theoccultconsultancy.blogspot.com/2011/09/la-madama.html
http://sansespiritismo.blogspot.com/2011/10/commission-of-madamas-and-congos.html[/quote]

It’s crazy that you bring up the association between this and advertising figures like Aunt Jemima, because this happens a lot where they throw in characters that have very historied (made that word up, I’m thinkin’ I’m gonna start makin’ more words up… it’s fun to do) imagery. Of course many of us will miss these things, but it happens more often that not from what I can see.[/quote]

so this means aunt jemima is a La madama spirit


#4

Yes, it very well probably is the case, and can account for the fact that Aunt Jemima is such an American icon, despite the fact that it’s common knowledge that she is at least reference to the slave-style Mammy. You would think that a reference to something like that would turn away black customers, but I don’t know a single black family (including my own) who can’t recollect some epic throwdowns that included Aunt Jemima pancakes. These characters are all over, especially in things like video games and things of that nature. I can’t remember the amount of times I was caught reading some magick work, only to find out that I saw this playing Final Fantasy. You do a cool move in a game, and never think, “I wonder if they had you do this spell in the game in order to cast something on yourself…” Things like this are actually really cool to me, because it let’s me know that magic is used a whole lot more than anyone really realizes.