Evoking the Hellenistic Deities

Anybody have an interesting stories that they would like to share? :slight_smile:

I have always felt a strong pull towards the deities of Hellenism and Olympus and found that it was easy to have success, and even more so since listening to insights from E.A., although I am still just a beginner.

I found it interesting that the stories have been rewritten to reflect a more patriarchal take. In the beginning, the gods were Matriarchal and the stories and personalities were different.

Thoughts? Experiences?

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You’re not wrong, but you’re not right either. Basically, before the Greeks and the Romans conquered Greece and Rome, there was another people who lived in the area originally. These people had a matriarchal pantheon and a matriarchal society. When the Greeks and the Romans came and conquered this people, they made all these rape myths to describe how much more powerful their patriarchal gods were. So, basically, anytime you read a rape story where a Greek/Roman god rapes a woman, that woman was a pre-Greco-Roman goddess. Like, Medusa, for example.

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I’m curious about this as well. I have a thread on Poseidon and I’m planning on evoking Cronus.

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Michael W Ford has a grimoire dedicated to the ancient Greek and Roman deities. I havent read it myself, so I cant say anything about it but you might wanna check it out. I’m also sure that you can find find other books on the subject. https://luciferianapotheca.com/collections/michael-w-ford-books-1/products/magick-of-the-ancient-gods-hardcover

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Interestingly enough, that is what I found out about Hades. Originally, he did not abduct Persophene…she took compassion on those that needed guidance to transition from being a disembodied spirit roaming the land. She guided them to the Underworld and ultimately partners with Hades.

Later writers turned it into an abduction. Anyway…

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I re-brushed up on my history so I can name the groups of people properly.

Originally, Persephone and Demeter were Sabine deites long before the Latins were around. The rape and abduction of Persephone was a later Latin myth to show the strength of the Latin pantheon.

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I hate the story about the rape, but that is good info. ty.

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I had great success with Hephaestus, and learned a LOT from Him about the true nature of patience and working through issues. Its interesting to go to work and realize that as awful and boring as work can be, it can also be an act of worship. I spent weeks at work giving my best and my all as a willing offering to Hephaestus, and as a reward, I became the person who teaches others to do the work.

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Yeah in work i couldn’t get online on my phone all morning and I handed my mobile phone to Hermes and he fiddled with it, I turned it off and on (one more time) and it was then back online

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There are loads of sources on Greek deities, mix it up using historical accounts as well as things found in occult litrature.

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I connect the most with the Hellenic deities, more than any others, and don’t require evocation to reach out to them, unlike other deities/entities. When I started working with them, the feeling I had was that they simply had always been around and had never left.

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@NoxLumina That’s great. Are you of Greek descent?

Not at all. But I feel as if the Greek (and Roman) deities are among Western civilization’s patron deities, and as if they were simply always around, because I grew up in this culture. They’re so much part of Western cultures that it’s easy to take them for granted - I spun in circles for so long looking for something more “exotic” thinking it would be more valid or relevant, it was easy to ignore the Hellenic gods simply because they were just there.

We talk about Cupid’s arrows, Father Time, the Grim Reaper, Mother Earth (Gaia). A lot of Christian iconography is borrowed from Greek and Roman mythology. The Christian Hell is basically Tartarus. And it’s not like the planets aren’t named after the Roman names of some of those gods, or anything. More of the Greek and Roman gods are vestigial in my American culture than I even consciously realized for a long time and once I started seeing it, I couldn’t unsee it.

When I started getting into the whole idea of gods and connecting to them, the Greek gods were simply already there.

FWIW, I am not a Reconstructionist.

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@NoxLumina Ya know, those are some of the reasons why some of my most favorite magical workings deal with the Hellenistic Deities. Its because the names are unrelated to biblical heroes and villans for the most part and most of the mythology does not sound like a twisted version of Abrahamic faiths. Anyway…

This makes so much sense. I have also, always, looked beyond the Greek deities because I felt their accessibility, somehow, made them less important. I needed to seek out more obscure deities. Now I have found that my prior knowledge of the mythology and the ever prevalent presence in our Western culture has made them easier to work with.

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