Chinese Necromancy

Hi, Do you know if Chinese have their own version of Necromancy? I found this in the book and started researching but there are no books on the subject. So maybe somebody is familiar with the Flower Tower process.

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Not sure about necromancy but they have vampiric mythology.

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I consider myself something of a Chinese sorcerer (not that I am Chinese just that Chinese magic is among the main paths I practice). I am really not that good. Just a beginner taking their first steps. Nevertheless I think that I can say with reasonable certainty that their is a Chinese version of what could be considered necromancy. The Jiangshi mentioned above is supposed to be a necromantic creation, though I’ve never met anyone who sincerely claims to be able to do that. (If anyone can I would be grateful if you PM’d me). Also draining chi from someone through physical contact (like the Jiangshi are supposed to be able to) is a practice that I am familiar with and have employed to varying degrees of success (I am still a beginner). The idea is essentially that you drain someone’s chi instantly by touch so that they have absolutely no strength to resist you when you for example push them straight into a wall. (A quick rule of thumb is that if you feel any struggling or resistance you haven’t properly drained them). You can also throw the energy you drained back at the now defenceless target if you are feeling particularly nasty. Sorry I am not going to provide the technique here. I consider it something of my little secret. More commonly though the summoning and usage of ghosts is a common and widespread practice if it’s prevalence among sites related to Chinese magic is any indication. A Kuman Thong for example though not strictly speaking a Chinese creation seems to be a practice that many Chinese sorcerers in South East Asia are quite familiar with. Essentially the sorcerer takes a fetus roasts it, and covers it in gold leaf to create something like an amulet. I think I also read somewhere about killing a dog, and writing a victim’s name on a talisman before burning it to unleash the dog’s vengeful spirit on them. (I am pretty sure that’s not the entire ritual, but it captures the general idea). Also ancestor worship is a common practice in China so don’t be too surprised if any Chinese sorcerer has an army of ancestor’s behind them. Sorry about the vague answer. I am not actually a Chinese necromancer (though I am both a practitioner of Chinese magic and a practitioner of non Chinese necromancy). I hope that my answer gives some insight into some of what may be possible though.

P.S. If there are any Chinese necromancers on here who think I’ve completely misrepresented their art please correct me. I am simply stating some of the information I’ve found on necromancy while practicing the non necromantic aspects of the Chinese magickal path. I am not an expert, and I probably shouldn’t be talking about this sort of thing at all when the only practice that I’ve talked about that I can actually do is chi draining, and even that only barely.

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Thank you very much for writing and providing great information. As my research continues I will share more info on this page or I can message you.If you want to contact me personally please send me a personal message.

Warm Regards,

Vito

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Thank you. Any information your research reveals will be highly appreciated.

Chinese necromancy. Is that the title of the new Guns 'n Roses album? :joy:

It would be a good title for Queen album for sure. But Guns 'n Roses would work just fine.

Yes they definitely do. They gave gods that are diefied human beings hence a strong connection to the dead. Look up the Chinese god of war Kwan Kung who is the deified Guan Yu. Any time you pray to or evoke or invoke this being,you are contacting the dead.
His deity names:

Deity names * Sangharama Bodhisattva (伽藍菩薩)

  • Guān Dì (關帝; " Divus Guan")
  • Guān Gōng (關公; “Lord Guan”)
  • Guān Shèng Dì Jūn (關聖帝君; “Holy Ruler Deity Guan”)

Taoism has many branches, schools. Inner alchemy is one of them. Qi Gong energy work is another. Necromancy is supposed a huge school in Taoism. Out of the 8 immortals in Chinese Dao mythology their leader is supposed to be a Perfect master of Necromancy. The de facto leader a Perfect master of Inner Alchemy and Energy Work.

Again it goes on to show that occult through out History and Geography ultimately has some core principles-schools upon which all of it is based.!

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Thank you for great information. I wonder if there are any books on rituals of this type of Necromancy. I like the idea of working with the dis-incarnate humans rather than deities. Working with deities adds an extra layer of complexity. Also I wonder if there were any practical applications in Chinese necromancy that connects to trade and healing occupations. If such work exists I can probably adapt it to my Necromancy work that pertains primarily working with Daemons and dis-incarnate humans from my local cemetery.

Hi. Like kiss-lama-lilith has said, there is a myth of Jiangshi (Basically dead people coming alive, which is actually more like zombies), and the Hmong (Miao) people have an ancient way to control it.
湘西赶尸XiangXiGanShi

Most necromancers in China do their rituals in the way of Taoism and Buddhism. Others worship their ancestors or local heroes (Mostly historical figures; GuanGong is one of the examples).
诸葛亮ZhuGe Liang
People worship gods and creatures in Chinese mythology too, since most of them are human at first but becomes gods after their great contributions.
八仙Eight Immortals
黄帝Yellow Emperor
钟馗Zhong Kui

You can search “Chinese folk religion”, “MaoShan Taoism”, “Chinese Buddhism”, “QingMing festival” (a Memorial and Remembrance Day), “ZhongYuan festival” (another memorial and remembrance day; it is also a day when the gate of underworld is opened and a festival for spirits) etc. for more information.
Or you can simply check out WuxiaWorld. There are many Taoism-basic novels, can be helpful for a basic other standing. XD

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Thank you for wonderful information. I will research in what you have presented.

On a side note. There is a great show on netflix that I was watching called Dark Tourist. The first episode is about Japan. There is a Aokigahara forest on the northwestern flank of Japan’s Mount Fuji. Would seem like an ideal place to initiate relationships with daemons for maybe Justice work.

Are there places like this in China?

At some point in the next two years I am planning to travel to China or Japan to find places similar to Aokigahara to research in to writing a book on Justice sorcery. It would be connected to justice work and would concern with sorcery related to vengeance. I have some experience in this area while working with other peoples stuff. A place with extremely violent disposition would be ideal, not easy to find in USA since here there is only 300 years of history to account for.

I am not sure if there are places like Aokigahara in China. It seems like they hardly commit suicide–It is said that their body, skin, and hair is granted from their parents, and they should protect them to show respect to their parents (From:The Classic of Filial Piety ).
However, as far as I know, China used to be one of the most damaged battlefields in WWII, so you can find some of the places where some great battles have happened. There might have something you like.
Places like Great Wall, The Forbidden City, Yangtze River are recommended:
Great Wall Folktale
Tales of Forbidden City
Death in the mother river of China
Lop Nur

I don’t know much about Chinese necromancy ( I’m more into deities and mythology). Maybe you can ask some local elders or the owner of some antique stores there. It seems like most of them are more like the keepers of tradition and much wiser mentors than me.

P.S: Some of those places can be extremely dangerous (Don’t try Lop Nur) and I am not sure if western magick can work efficiently there. Take a jade amulet with some ancient creatures like QiLin or PiXiu, just in case (btw Buddhism and Taoism magick seems to work fine there).

Thank you excellent points and information. Would need to seriously prepare for this.

No problem (thank you for asking actually–your book is pretty interesting, I hardly know about Chinese women in ancient times).

Have wondered about this before as well! Would like to study this deeper than the usual online sources. Hopefully OP updates and/or more knowledgeable Chinese necromancers share their experiences here. :slight_smile:

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Practical Chinese necromancy is widespread throughout south east asia, for example look at the kumanthongs and other such spirit familiars.

The Mao Shan and Yin Shan sect are good sources when it comes to taoist necromancy, not to say that there aren’t other sects that practice it but they’re the ones who do it more than most.

As for methods, most will use a mixture of ritual, paper talismans, chanting, and various ritual implements like swords and command flags.

The magical amulet community tends to be the easiest way for people to access Asian necromancy, but keep in mind most people you find on those forums are more hobbyist’s than magicians, and are more religious than magical.

They are however more open to meeting in real life and discussing than most, so if you live in an asian country maybe someone would be willing to meet up with you.

If you want to try and decipher it yourself however, a good starting point is the 5 ghosts.