Can someone explain E.A. Koetting's newest video

What’s interesting is that the Egyptians hoiked their organs OUT as part of the spiritual immortality process, and placed them under guardianship of distinct gods:

Whether that is in any way conceptually related, and if it is, whether that means they were trying to accomplish the same goals, or something different, who knows. There is a site that shows a lot of Egyptian art that may represent “third eye” (this site has some political-related stuff on other pages iirc, take that to PM if anyone wants to talk about it please):

The spiritual act of “Awakening The Third Eye”—still taught in Eastern traditions like Hinduism—was the central doctrine of the ancient Egyptian religion for thousands of years. I have been presenting and explaining Third Eye symbolism in Egypt online for many years; you can learn more about my perspective in my 2011 book, Written In Stone. This article is an abridged version of a chapter from Written In Stone.

Full article: Third Eye In Ancient Egypt - Graham Hancock Official Website



It’s not impossible that they told people “Make your chains stronger, and one day you will fly” - I mean outright deception, keep doing this and one day wonderful things will happen.

Not sure I believe that because IMO a lot of this stuff is based on dualism of a very Christian type, where bad is the new good and good is boring and stops you doing what you want, and that doesn’t fit 100% with my experience of the world, and of spiritual realsm and forces, in fact the reduction into those terms which flourished Zoroastrianism seems to me to have been a maiming blow that slowly spread out across the world (I’ve met some very nice Zoroastrian people, my comment is about the metaphysics alone).

Prior to that things were understood in a more complex way, and the position of Set in the Egyptian pantheon as a valuable guardian of the essentials of life is a good example of that.



There seem to be energy centres in 3 of the same places though, although as you say where they are envisioned is different. I have always felt solar plexus more to the front, naval internal, within the lower abdomen, but then I have theories about the vagus nerve I have not seen discussed anywhere else.

1 Like

And this (my emphasis) is even suggestive of Purusha, the cosmic man of Hinduism, and the way in which (in core shamanism) the World Tree will in some contexts be accessible within the spine of the practitioner:

The sons of Horus were also the gods of the cardinal compass points.[9] Each god was responsible for protecting a particular organ, and was himself protected by a companion goddess. They were:

  • Hapi, the baboon-headed god representing the north, whose jar contained the lungs and was protected by the goddess Nephthys. Hapi is often used interchangeably with the god Hapi, though they are actually different gods.
  • Duamutef, the jackal-headed god representing the east, whose jar contained the stomach and was protected by the goddess Neith
  • Imsety, the human-headed god representing the south, whose jar contained the liver and was protected by the goddess Isis
  • Qebehsenuef, the falcon-headed god representing the west, whose jar contained the intestines and was protected by the goddess Serqet.[10]

Important: the direct relevance of ALL the above is that drawing down, “presencing” Source power of unbridled creative/destructive power, God into man not man on his knees looking “out there” to God, is the epitome of modern LHP thinking.

It’s like breadcrumbs of a model for metaphysically understanding the cosmos, the manifest and unmanifest All, within you.

3 Likes

I was going to say, who hasn’t seen “superpowered” abilities? Lol? If you run in the right circles and have a natural affinity for these things where it’s generational and apart of your god-given lineage, you’ve probably seen some first hand “super powered” things. I knew a Haitian voodoo priests son who could do some real funny things and didn’t even practice voodoo. Just born with it. He’s what got me on my path.

1 Like

I knew about this. They also lobotomized mummies so that the spirits could stay in the “summer lands” for a longer period of time, since they believed the spirit didn’t have to be reborn into this world until the brain was destroyed.

I understand this, but this may not refer to the chakra system. All cultures believe in clairvoyance.

This is a very good point, as is the one regarding duality.

You could teach me anytime, I am open to your teachings. Here is another source proving that Dantien and chakra are not the same, it’s from a website connected to the Lotus tradition sect, which Damo Mitchell is a part of.
http://www.scholarsage.com/the-chakra-in-daoism/

It is true that they overlap though, and I can understand why people think they are the same. I did the same thing until very recently.

This is a very interesting concept. Is this what Greeks meant by Henosis? I did not know about the information you mentioned above and am grateful to you for exposing me to it.

2 Likes

It’s been a while since I read up on history of Hindu ideas, yoga, etc., and I am rusty on it, but this is from the history site I linked above, my emphasis once again in the text:

The Vedas are the oldest written tradition in India, (1,500 – 500 B.C.) recorded from oral tradition by upper caste Brahmins, who may have been descended from the Aryan stock which entered India from the north. The original meaning of the word chakra as “wheel” refers to the chariot wheels of the rulers, called cakravartins. (The correct spelling is cakra, though pronounced with a ch as in church.) The word was also a metaphor for the sun …

The birth of a cakravartin was said to herald a new age, and they were described as preceded by a golden disk of light, much like the halo of Christ, only this spinning disk was seen in front of them (perhaps their powerful third chakras). It is also said that the god Vishnu descended to Earth, having in his four arms a cakra, a lotus flower, a club, and a conch shell. (This may have referred to a cakra as a discus-like weapon.)

There is some mention of the chakras as psychic centers of consciousness in the Yoga Upanishads (circa 600B.C.) and later in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali (circa 200 B.C.).

Perhaps the idea they were situated in the spine is a recent add-on? Our own recent medical history is full of examples of people misunderstanding things, and creating entire theories based on false knowledge.

3 Likes

I would also like to add my biggest gripe with the chakras, is as you stated above, its relation to RHP practices resulting into merging or dissolving into all. I have no problem with energy points related to it in Taoism because they are related to the meridians and not connected to dogma.

1 Like

Possibly, Stephen Flowers’ book “Lords Of The Left Hand Path” is a good resource for this, this quote covers the basics:

Essentially, the left-hand path is the path of non-union with the objective universe. It is the way of isolating consciousness within the subjective universe and, in a state of self-imposed psychic solitude, refining the soul or psyche to ever more perfect levels. The objective universe is then made to harmonize itself with the will of the individual psyche rather than the other way around. Where the right-hand path is theocentric (or certainly alleocentric: “other centred”), the left-hand path is psychecentric, or soul/self-centred. Those within the left-hand path may argue over the nature of this self/ego/soul, but the idea that the individual is the epicentre of the path itself seems undisputed. An eternal seperation of the individual intelligence from the objective universe is sought in the left-hand path. This amounts to an immortality of the independent self-consciousness moving within the objective universe, and interacting with it at will.

3 Likes

Lady Eva I ready that thread before and actually tried it my self it felt a lot like after I removed my chakras except I felt better the morning after

1 Like

I am a huge fan of this guy, have this book, and am currently working through his Futhark book. I have not yet gotten to all his other books but will most certainly get to them in due time. I thank you for this stimulating exchange, and for giving me much to ponder about, and for reaffirming my admiration of Flowers/Thorsson. I hope you have a pleasant evening.

1 Like

Going back up to the Purusha stuff, aside from energy centres and organs, to the spine: use of pillars, columns etc is found from vodou, to the Djed pillars of Egypt, to the axis mundi concept of shamanic cultures.

So this is in no way some newage syncretisation whereby you can map everything onto everything else and reduce it all down to psychobabble, but still, the same themes come up, with body as metaphor of, and manifestation of, various divine forces.

And within the grasp of man, not “out there” not requiring dissolution forever into the All.

2 Likes

My only caution about Stephen Flowers is that he tends to graft Setian magical theory onto things. That’s either a good or bad thing depending on how you look at it. I tend to ignore the Temple of Set’s definitions for the most part.

2 Likes

I prefer the Set = Point of Chaos Arising concept of the individuated self to the random “let’s just be dark lords because darkness isn’t light and light makes you eat all your vegetables” stuff.

The Set current I have encountered is like a breath of liberation from being thoughts held in the mind of the All (per Kybalion, essentially alive and fully capable but operating on NPC-tier) to becoming fully realised, both seeing oneself as part of the All, and (LHP) seeing the All as a potential of the self.

Small “s” there fully intentional.

6 Likes

Yeah, I prefer the Hermetic take on things myself. I never thought that the idea that the rhp was about merging with the objective universe ever made any sense. The objective universe is concensus physical reality. I don’t know of anyone trying to merge with that. The rhp as I have seen it is about dissolution into the All. Or just being good and hoping to go to heaven. Either way, they aspire to unite somehow with a creator in the spiritual dimension. The spiritual, as Setians define it, is part of the subjective universe.

1 Like

I am aware of this bias, but honestly I see very little of it in this particular book. He has another book called black runa which is loaded with Setian concepts though. I’m not necessarily opposed to the Setian current, since I confess Aquino was somebody who was responsible for my interest in the occult. I spoke with him numerous times on a forum named the 600club too, this is where he informed me about the extent to which PSYOPS have become commonplace.

This document I referenced in a previous thread was something he himself made me aware of -Freedom of Information Act Electronic Reading Room | CIA FOIA (foia.cia.gov)

Although at the time there were many more pieces which have been removed.

I’m only opposed to Setian ideology due to its connections to the Qlippoth, and thus it’s Abrahamic roots.

1 Like

This is beautifully put, and reminds me of the Red Magus.

This is my perception of it too. As previously stated, you have good taste.

1 Like

If you mean Futhark, no I don’t think it’s in there.

Aquino is a nice enough guy, as long as you agree with him.

I never saw any of that in my time in the ToS. I suppose things can change in twenty years.

1 Like

What cosmogony did you use when you were there? Or were you allowed to work with whichever you preferred? What’s your take on Michael Kelly?

1 Like

That was kind of a weird time, but it was a bit of chaos magic and laVeyan Satanism. There were different orders which did different things, but I left before joining one. So you weren’t locked into a particular system. As for Michael Kelly, I only vaguely remember him.

1 Like

You are a man of wisdom, and have good taste in video games judging by your avatar. I hope to read more posts by you in the future.

1 Like