Strange Land Formation Near Where I live. Any thoughts?

Looks like a meteor strike.

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Oh yeah I have to upload the pics of the meteoirte I saw and then found. I am terrible at taking pics. I took these at my Mom’s hosue awhile ago with a shitty camera but got a new phone with a better camera. Will take more today.

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What’s the human history of them - was there a Native American presence there once? And what Europeans were the first to see them? That can be helpful in thinking through what kind of spirituality lingers around a place.

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Just found this: https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?s=Sutter%20Buttes&item_type=topic
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Before European settlement

The Sutter Buttes figure prominently in the creation stories and other traditions of the indigenous Maidu and Wintun peoples. The Nisenan Maidu lived on the East side of the Buttes, while the Patwin Wintun lived on the West side. The Maidu name for the Sutter Buttes is Histum Yani (middle mountains of the Valley) or Esto Yamani,[10] while the Wintun name for the Sutter Buttes is Onolai-Tol.[11] All of these names roughly mean “The Middle Mountains”.

While there were only seasonal encampments in the buttes, both of these tribes visited the buttes regularly to gather acorns and other foods or to hunt game. The Buttes were also a center of regional Native American religion. According to anthropologist Alfred Kroeber, the Patwin village where the city of Colusa now stands was the “hotbed” where the Kuksu Cult was established. This religion spread through much of northern California. Ceremonies were performed in earthen dance lodges where spirit impersonators would re-enact ancient mythological events.

In the Maidu religion, the Sutter Buttes is the place where dying people came to ascend to the afterlife.[7]
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Well there you go. Those people went there to pray, to die, and to hunter/gather. Now you have a string to start pulling when you go there, or think about those places -

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True. I kinda want to go there and wander. The Ranchers are hostile and allow no one on the land though. I might try contacting some of them and seeing if I can camp out for a few nights. It’s facinating to me.

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If actually going there is a strikeout, think about pathways that they probably used to get there - which may or may not correspond to modern roads - and that could be just as useful as (1) a way to focus yourself and (2) a way to catch some of the place’s energy.

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