“Share A Quote” Thread

@IrisAthena I’m honored thank you :blush:

2 Likes

“there is no greater curse than eagerness”-Freyja

5 Likes

“See them, floundering in their sense of mine, like fish in the puddles of a dried-up stream — and, seeing this, live with no mine, not forming attachment for states of becoming.” The Buddha

2 Likes

“The only way to find your true potential and true power, is to embrace pain and transform it into strength.” - Dragon Spirit

4 Likes

"And when I rolled into Dallas…I was real thirsty–so I went into a bar…and started drinking beer; and more beer, and more beer. Then I started throwing darts, playing pool, drinking beer.

Then I got on one of those mechanical bulls. I rode that bull front ways, side ways, backwards, front ways; two-handed, one-handed, no-handed. Finally–had to shut that son of a bitch down because I wore it out.

Then I started drinking more beer. And I started a fight. And then the whole bar started fighting. I whooped everybody’s ass."

– Stone Cold Steve Austin

6 Likes

6 Likes

5 Likes

“Christian missionaries came close to baptizing King Radbed, but before carrying through with the ceremony and conversion he asked a question, “Where are my dead ancestors at present?” Wolfram the Christian missionary answered, “In Hell, with all other unbelievers.” Upon hearing this, Radbed changed his mind about converting and replied, “Then I would rather live there with my honourable ancestors than go to heaven with a parcel of beggars.” Beggars here refers to Christians as a whole, but also to the long-time enemies of the Frisians: the Franks who were by this point in time primarily Christian. Radbed then expelled the missionaries from the kingdom for no other reason than how important his ancestors were to him. He could not bear the thought of being separated from them.”

7 Likes

“'For the theourgoí do not fall under the fate-governed herd.” – from the Chaldean Oracles

6 Likes

“When this
world is miserable, when you see the misery around
you, rather than acting as a God would act, rather than
commanding the tempest to cease, you instead flee.
This is the final incarnation, the world into which you
have forced yourself, yet rather than fulfilling your
purpose here – which is to become a god in this, the
only realm where that is possible – you instead struggle
to leave this world and disappear into that infinite
nothingness, the omnipresent quandary from which you
descended. This world, this life of yours, is the next
phase of your existence. Eternity is not a cycle, but is
an ever-constant expansion of the self. Now that you
have achieved both the realization of your infinitude,
and the singularity-state of the physical body, you can
begin to expand from that singularity.”

-Ant’harratu - from the book of azazel

5 Likes

“There is no doubt in my mind-only the doubts others place on me”-My own quote

4 Likes

When did a dragon ever die
from the poison of a snake?

~Nietzsche

5 Likes

I’ve been meaning to read some Nietzsche. What book would you suggest I start with, @Moontan?

3 Likes

Thus Spoke Zarathustra. It’s the only one I’ve read so I can’t really advice you. I only have it because my late brother was into philosophy.

3 Likes

Thank you, @Moontan. I believe that’s his most famous, correct? So probably a good place to start.

3 Likes

Idk. Like I said I’m not into philosophy. :woman_shrugging: A lot of words to say the simplest of things. I always feel these people like to hear themself talk.

3 Likes

LOL, well, you may be right, there. :smile:

3 Likes

Hehehe. :yum: Between all his books I found, I did like Jung’s Man and His Symbols. Which isn’t philosophy but definitely a good one.

3 Likes

I see the attack
I move
It passes
Beautiful victory

4 Likes

Narada went to Vishnu and asked him the meaning of Maya. … In response, Vishnu said, “I will explain after you quench my thirst. …” Narada went to a river to fetch water. But as he was collecting the water, he saw a beautiful girl. He was so drawn to her that he followed her to her village and asked her father for her hand in marriage. The father agreed and the two got married. Before long, Narada was a father and then grandfather and then great grandfather. …

Suddenly one day, it rained. And the rains refused to stop. The river swelled and broke its banks. Water rushed into Narada’s house, and to his horror, swept away his wife, his children, his grandchildren and his great grandchildren. He screamed and shouted for help as the water dragged him under. Suddenly he … found himself … before Vishnu. “Narada,” said Vishnu, “where is my water? I am still thirsty.” Narada did not understand. Where was his family, his wife’s village, the river? “Where does this pain and suffering come from, Narada?” asked Vishnu. … “I thought you had full knowledge of Maya before you set out to fetch water for me.”

Narada bowed his head in realization. He knew Maya but had never experienced Maya. … Unless one experiences Maya, one will not be able to empathize with those who are trapped in it.
Story of Narada

1 Like