Pentagram vs. Inverted Pentagram - The Truth

We know all the intellectual mumbo jumbo about the pentagram.
But from a functional perspective in ritual,
what difference does it make whether traditional or inverted?

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[quote=“Student of Goetia, post:1, topic:4257”]We know all the intellectual mumbo jumbo about the pentagram.
But from a functional perspective in ritual,
what difference does it make whether traditional or inverted?[/quote]
Controlable and uncontrolable is the difference I think.

[quote=“Student of Goetia, post:1, topic:4257”]We know all the intellectual mumbo jumbo about the pentagram.
But from a functional perspective in ritual,
what difference does it make whether traditional or inverted?[/quote]

36 degrees.

Accirding to a book i read,the nice one bring thigs,ti ya,love,money,etc,the inverted,banish,revenge, he test,the author,through i like mixin it,putting a goal,wish,behind them,

Another way to look at it is that the upright pantagram (and any other *gram with a single point facing upwards, think wand or sword) is masculine and pushes energy out and the inverted pentagram (and any *gram with two points facing upwards, think chalice) is feminine and draws energy in.

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Are there any ancient examples of the inverted pentagram?

With me the running theme is that:

The point-up pentagram deals with the (individual) human, the ego, the microcosm. The point-down pentagram turns this on its head and evokes more universal, anti-ego, macrocosmic forces. A lot of evil has been heaped on the point-down pentagram because of its very destructive tendencies, much like nature itself (which in these same peoples’ ideology was originally called by their god “very good”, to say nothing of their modern descendents’ horrendous stewardship of their surroundings and general lack of responsibility - but I digress). And these forces can absolutely annihilate the ego, so people unprepared for that can equate it with something absolutely a threat to them.

But they are both a part of the whole. That, at least, is my -personal- take.

As far as ancient examples of the inverted version, I can’t say with authority any earlier than Levi, and for the regular version I don’t personally know of any earlier than Pythagoras.

However, they are Symbols, and in that context they can be considered Timeless irrespective of when they entered into our causal timeline. If that’s not too great of a stretch for you to indulge me in.

But for your specific question: I don’t know! Lol.

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“Traditionally” there wasn’t really any known distinction made between inverted or upright pentagrams. That “tradition” (as far as I have seen) only came in the last century or so “thanks” to Eliphas Levi. The ancients used them both pretty much interchangeably - possibly using the inverted even more I’d wager.

An example of the inverted pentagram being used in history (not particularly ancient mind you…) is in the Amiens cathedral which was built in the 1200’s. The north transept rose (containing the inverted pentagram) was constructed at the latest in the 1300’s.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amiens_Cathedral#mediaviewer/File:Amiens_cath%C3%A9drale16.JPG

No association with evil at all (though I guess one might consider the church evil).

That said, since it is a modern association which has been inflicted on most people’s minds, I’m certain there can be some benefit drawn from that association. It’s just not one the ancients had as far as I can tell.