Native American Current


#1

On both sides of my family I have connections to native Americans. (Cherokee, Blackfoot, not sure of their classification on my dad’s side) how/would this blood connection have anything to do with my affinity toward magick and spirituality? Do native Americans have systems of Magick? This has been becoming a really big interest to me for I feel something reached and feel it would be good for me to study more into it.


#2

Start studying all forms of shamanism. I’ve noticed a high percentage of Blackfoot blood among magicians in the northeast america region, myself included


#3

I know Denise Alvarado does some stuff with Native American Magic.


#4

I recommend a book called Black Elk Speaks. It is one of the few texts I know of where the author interviewed (through a translator who was the shaman’s son) a Lakota Medicine Man who was practicing in the early 1900’s. In it are explained some of the practices Black Elk used. I’m not sure if they would be the same as those used by your bloodline, but it might provide some insight.


#5

The Cherokee were one of the only to have a written language so perhaps you could look into it to see their religious/shamanic practices. I had a book about their language when I was younger and tried to learn some of it but never stuck with it.

That’s pretty cool you’ve got both Blackfoot and Cherokee ancestors, I do as well.


#6

Thank you for the references and materials always appreciated. @ TWF “Blood Buddies” :wink: lol. This would explain a lot and I can’t wait to see what pops up from this as I start digging. Kevin Turner did an interview with Robert Bruce pertaining to shamanism I have more reason to look into it more now.

Delaware would fall into that northeast region. Does spirituality really follow someone through their blood?


#7

You might not be able to find much. Most of the time, books out there are by white new Agers who do nothing but pervert the traditions.
Personally, I say, work with your ancestors, calling out specially to the native American ones, to help you along this path.


#8

How would you connect with ancestors would you say Native American ancestors guide me? If that works with spirits shouldn’t it work with you bloodline? I feel I’m going to have to feel this process out if that’s true.


#9

Uh, no. Just saying that won’t help.
Set up an altar and hang out with them once a week, give offerings of water, candles, incense… Usual stuff like that.
Look at these links:
http://hoodoofoundry.com/casting/the-ancestor-altar/
http://www.carolinaconjure.com/the-ancestors.html

The first link also specifically mentions working with Black Hawk for native American spirits. I have not worked with him so I can’t confirm this.


#10

Every couture has spirituality in there blood, you just have to look beyond the current spiritually dead religions and find thier original beliefs.

As for finding out about Native Americans, one of my properties borders the Mono Reservation here in the Sierra Nevadas: make friends with the local Indians then when close ask to see a traditional elder. Even on the reservations there are few who practice the traditional ways, but there is always one who does.

My nephews wife told me this and she is full blood Mono and her dad sits on the tribal counsel. I don’t work with their beliefs, and I don’t plan to; but this is her advice for people who do.


#11

If your wanting to find your Cherokee ancestors I’d start with some genealogy websites, once you get some names you can check some of the Cherokee Rolls where they enrolled to either have their native land until their death or made the Trail of Tears.

You can also check here both for rolls and search your ancestors
http://cherokeeregistry.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=387&Itemid=582


#12

Remember as well that “shaman” is a word from the Evenk (Tunguska - norther Russian area) language and that you may need to find the names specific to the tribes you want to research to find out more - “shaman” is a loan-word in any tongue except those Evenk guys.


#13

Lady Eva, you took the words out of my mouth. I’ve been practicing shamanism for about 10 years now and I can tell you for sure that the word “shaman” has nothing to do with Native Americans. Actually, it’s a Siberian term.


#14

Given that, its kinda funny the multitudes of native americans that will call themselves shamans…regardless of the label the work is still the same