1 Billion Dollars!


#1

There is a contest that Warren Buffet and Quickbooks is doing. They are offering 1 Billion dollars for a person to guess the perfect bracket which is 68 Basketball games. You have to predict which team will win for every single game before they play. There is a 1 in 6,000,000,000,000,000,000 (Quintillion) Chance that you guess it all right.

The reason I put it here? Challenge your divination skills and put them to the test! Must be 21 and over to enter it and the time you can enter is in March. It is a March madness event only open to the first 10,000,000 entrants. Either you have perfect divination skills or you have God like luck!

Good luck!


#2

So The Wandering Fool gets to win the billion dollars and I get to watch?


#3

Pretty much! Hah I even asked him if he could divinate!


#4

I have God like Good Luck… even more, I have NICE Luck

I’ll try it anyways, my divination skills are growing as well.

thanks


#5


#6

Hahaha!


#7

I won’t be participating, I haven’t found a system or spirit or whatever that can predict sporting matches with enough consistency. I think there are too many factors like individual players and their relationships not only to the team and how they work but outside influences such as personal lives and injuries and confidence, coaches calling the right plays and ref’s making the right calls and not being biased.

When I was doing predictions on the regular NFL season I would bounce anywhere between 20-70% accuracy from week to week. You’d be better off getting in good with a sports fanatic who keeps up with who plays and shows up to practice and all that kind of stuff.


#8

I won’t be participating, I haven’t found a system or spirit or whatever that can predict sporting matches with enough consistency. I think there are too many factors like individual players and their relationships not only to the team and how they work but outside influences such as personal lives and injuries and confidence, coaches calling the right plays and ref’s making the right calls and not being biased.

When I was doing predictions on the regular NFL season I would bounce anywhere between 20-70% accuracy from week to week. You’d be better off getting in good with a sports fanatic who keeps up with who plays and shows up to practice and all that kind of stuff.[/quote]

True enough, I’ve tried doing it too and wasn’t able to get good results.


#9

Years ago I learnt from a book about pendulum magic and, like most people, was stoked to see it in action with some test questions. Well, pretty much that same week I sat down with my pendulum and a lottery ticket and went through each of the 48 numbers ("Will number 1 be chosen, will number 2 be chosen, number 3 etc. etc.) noting down the number to which the pendulum indicated ‘yes’. At the end of the process, out of the 48 numbers, the pendulum had only indicated a ‘yes’ to six numbers, no more no less…which is exactly the number of balls which make up the draw in the UK. I repeated the process, and same results again.

Off I went to the convenience store with my lottery ticket in hand and with the surety that I was about to become a multi-millionaire.

The draw came, and not one of my numbers was selected!

For a short while I thought pendulum magick was just bullshit. But then, when I thought about it, it occurred to me that at any one point in the present time, countless factors can influence future events (the old ‘a butterfly flaps its wings in the Amazon at a given time, and a hurricane brews in the Atlantic’). In other words, at any given moment in the present, countless futures are possible (even if we are only talking about a future a millisecond away).

So I came to the conclusion that the six numbers predicted with the pendulum were indeed winning lottery numbers for that weekends draw, just that it was for a possible future (one of countless alternative futures) that was just not the future that I arrived at (due to the countless combination of events, actions etc. in the intervening period that led me to the experienced future).

Anyway, not sure if this makes any sense to you all, but I do not believe it is possible to use divination to accurately predict a precise future event…as many different futures are possible at any given time. Which future you actually arrive at cannot be pre-determined. You would only receive an accurate prediction for a future that the odds are seriously, seriously against you to actually experience.

I believe that future divination is only useful for questions of a more general “what would be the LIKELY outcome if I did this/that?” nature.


#10

For the last time, the physical world manifests from an astral one. This is how and why magic works, people. Divination does not show you the future, it shows you a current astral reality that may become physical. Usually this may be quite clearly defined with little variation of possibilities. however, for such a random event as a lottery draw, with millions of equiprobable outcomes, there’s nothing of the sort. Really, if you don’t believe me just try to scry the lottery and see the numbers on the winning balls. I guarantee that they will change every time you look at them, and if you try to shape them yourself they will not last. Nobody will ever divine lottery numbers with accuracy before the events. and influencing the outcome is going to be nearly as tricky.

Sports matches on the other hand … it would be theoretically possible, but dangerous, to create outcomes. I mean, if a few star players came down with something, or died in a plan crash, that would pretty much fix things.


#11

Then there is only one way to get this type of guessing done; Math!


#12

Gasp The “M” word!


#13

I guess someone could try to combine the very best picks made by an expert in the sport, with divination on which of those picks are most likely to have the influences you mentioned above knocking them off form… I’m thinking of what E.A. has said about getting an expert to pick out investments, then he uses magick at the final stage to cream off the most likely.

No certainties, but unless there’s an entry fee, which is the problem with experimenting with gambling, there’s no reason not to take a shot at it? I wouldn’t have a clue myself though!


#14

There is no entry fee for the contest at all. I’m going to put my trust in the stats.